Humaniser Max for Live MIDI Device

Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 11.19.32

Humaniser is a simple Max for Live MIDI device that serves to alter both the velocity and timing of notes within a clip. The possible range for velocity values can be determined either by the minimum/maximum note velocities currently present in the clip at the time humanisation takes place, or specified manually. It is also possible to lock/unlock the timing position of the very first note in the clip, so as to avoid the note being shifted back in time causing it to start before the beginning of the clip.

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Midi Fighter Multi-Sample on DJ TechTools

Midi Fighter Multi-Sample screenshot

You can now read about my Midi Fighter Multi-Sample Max for Live patch in an article I have written over on the DJ TechTools website.

The article provides easy to follow, step-by-step instructions detailing how to set up and use the patch in conjunction with the Drum Rack in Ableton Live; whilst the patch is now also available to download for free direct from the DJ TechTools site (providing you have a user account).

Alternatively, the patch is still available to download for free from maxforlive.com; with the most recent update including clearer, more straightforward setup instructions.

ScreenPlay Test

A recent test of ScreenPlay, the interactive computer music system I have been developing as part of my PhD research into human-computer interaction in music at the University of Salford.

The TouchOSC graphical user interfaces hosted on the four iPads communicate with Ableton Live 9 via a series of Max For Live patches and function much in the same way as does the Ableton Push MIDI controller; allowing for the button-matrix-style, grid-based playing surface to be locked in a specific key signature/scale or played chromatically, and for any standard triad within the selected key/scale to be formed using the same hand-shape in any position on the grid.

The next stage in the development of the system will be the introduction of both generative and transformative algorithmic procedures reliant upon second order Markovian processes and the alteration of rhythmic and textural/timbral characteristics, as well as the pitch-classes of the source-material respectively.